Articles

Pose estimation of a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer with applications to the automotive industry

[+] Author Affiliations
Xiandi Zeng

Automated Analysis Corporation, 2805 South Industrial, Suite 100, Ann Arbor, Michigan?48104

Alfred L. Wicks

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Blacksburg, Virginia?24061-0238

Thomas E. Allen

Ford Motor Company, Ford Research Laboratory, Dearborn, Michigan?48121

Opt. Eng. 37(5), 1442-1447 (May 01, 1998). doi:10.1117/1.601653
History: Received Oct. 20, 1997; Revised Dec. 5, 1997; Accepted Dec. 5, 1997
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Abstract

A scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) is an optical instrument that can scan an area to measure the velocity field of structures. It has been widely used in the automotive industry. In some applications, the pose (position and orientation) of the SLVD are required. First, this paper describes two such applications. Then it presents a nonlinear regressive model for the pose determination of the SLDV with respect to a structural coordinate system. The model is derived from coordinate transformation and the scanner model. In it, the pose is expressed by six independent parameters: three for the translation vector and three for the rotation matrix. The six parameters are estimated by using the least-squares technique. Statistical inferences about this model are obtained by linear approximation. To determine the pose, four or more registration (reference) points are required. For each registration point, the structural coordinates and its corresponding input voltages need to be known. The model has been implemented in a laser-based data acquisition system, which has been used for modal analysis, structural dynamic modifications, and noise control. © 1998 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

© 1998 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Xiandi Zeng ; Alfred L. Wicks and Thomas E. Allen
"Pose estimation of a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer with applications to the automotive industry", Opt. Eng. 37(5), 1442-1447 (May 01, 1998). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.601653


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