Optical System Design

MONS space telescope, part 2: analysis of very high stray-light rejection

[+] Author Affiliations
Christopher R. Boshuizen, Timothy R. Bedding

University of Sydney, School of Physics (A28), Sydney, New South Wales, 2006, Australia

M. Leigh Pfitzner, Mark G. Grimminck

Auspace Limited, 50 Hoskins Street, Mitchell, Australian Capital Territory, 2911, Australia

Hans Kjeldsen

University of Aarhus, Theoretical Astrophysics Center, Ny Munkegade, Bygn. 520 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark

Anthony G. Monger

University of Sydney, School of Physics (A28), Sydney, New South Wales, 2006, Australia

Opt. Eng. 47(1), 013001 (January 30, 2008). doi:10.1117/1.2831662
History: Received January 01, 2005; Revised July 24, 2007; Accepted August 16, 2007; Published January 30, 2008
Text Size: A A A

We develop new visualization and diagnostics techniques for the analysis of the mechanical causes of second-order scattered light, applying these to the stray-light analysis of the MONS space telescope, whose scientific aim is the measurement of low-amplitude photometric oscillations in stars. The telescope is designed to detect amplitudes of 1 part per million, requiring a high stray-light rejection factor, and is thus an ideal subject for this work. The analysis involved determining stray-light cases and then using an innovative approach to efficient high-order ray tracing to produce detailed predictions of the stray-light flux distributions. In addition to demonstrating the utility of the approaches developed here, the results of the analysis show that the MONS space telescope design meets the stray-light rejection requirements.

Figures in this Article
© 2008 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Christopher R. Boshuizen ; Timothy R. Bedding ; M. Leigh Pfitzner ; Mark G. Grimminck ; Hans Kjeldsen, et al.
"MONS space telescope, part 2: analysis of very high stray-light rejection", Opt. Eng. 47(1), 013001 (January 30, 2008). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2831662


Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.