Physical Optics, Diffractive Optics

Finite element method as applied to the study of gratings embedded in complementary metal-oxide semiconductor image sensors

[+] Author Affiliations
Guillaume Demésy

Institut Fresnel, Université Aix-Marseille III, École Centrale de Marseille, France and STMicroelectronics, Rousset, France

Frédéric Zolla, André Nicolet, Mireille Commandré, Caroline Fossati

Institut Fresnel, Université Aix-Marseille III, École Centrale de Marseille, France

Olivier Gagliano, Stéphane Ricq, Brendan Dunne

STMicroelectronics, Rousset, France

Opt. Eng. 48(5), 058002 (May 29, 2009). doi:10.1117/1.3139291
History: Received September 25, 2008; Revised March 24, 2009; Accepted April 01, 2009; Published May 29, 2009
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We present a new formulation of the finite element method (FEM) dedicated to the rigorous solution of Maxwell’s equations and adapted to the calculation of the scalar diffracted field in optoelectronic subwavelength periodic structures [for both transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) polarization cases]. The advantage of this method is that its implementation remains independent of the number of layers in the structure, the number of diffractive patterns, the geometry of the diffractive object, and the properties of materials. The spectral response of large test photodiodes that can legitimately be represented in 2-D has been measured on a dedicated optical bench and compared to the theory. The validity of the model as well as the possibility of conceiving in this way simple processible diffractive spectral filters are discussed.

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© 2009 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Guillaume Demésy ; Frédéric Zolla ; André Nicolet ; Mireille Commandré ; Caroline Fossati, et al.
"Finite element method as applied to the study of gratings embedded in complementary metal-oxide semiconductor image sensors", Opt. Eng. 48(5), 058002 (May 29, 2009). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3139291


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