Adaptive Optics

Adaptive optic correction using microelectromechanical deformable mirrors

[+] Author Affiliations
Julie A. Perreault

Boston University, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston, Massachusetts?02215

Thomas G. Bifano

Boston University, Aeromechanical Engineering, Boston, Massachusetts?02215 E-mail: tgb@bu.edu

B. Martin Levine

Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California?91109

Mark N. Horenstein

Boston University, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston, Massachusetts?02215

Opt. Eng. 41(3), 561-566 (Mar 01, 2002). doi:10.1117/1.1447230
History: Received June 16, 2000; Revised Sep. 20, 2001; Accepted Sep. 21, 2001
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A micromachined deformable mirror (μ-DM) for optical wavefront correction is described. Design and manufacturing approaches for μ-DMs are detailed. The μ-DM employs a flexible silicon membrane supported by mechanical attachments to an array of electrostatic parallel plate actuators. Devices are fabricated through surface micromachining using polycrystalline silicon thin films. μ-DM membranes measuring 2mm×2mm×2μm, supported by 100 actuators are described. Figures of merit include stroke of 2 μm, resolution of 10 nm, and frequency bandwidth dc to 7 kHz in air. The devices are compact, inexpensive to fabricate, exhibit no hysteresis, and use only a small fraction of the power required for conventional DMs. Performance of an adaptive optics system using a μ-DM is characterized in a closed-loop control experiment. Significant reduction in quasistatic wavefront phase error is achieved. Advantages and limitations of μ-DMs are described in relation to conventional adaptive optics systems and to emerging applications of adaptive optics such as high-resolution correction, small-aperture systems, and optical communication. © 2002 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

© 2002 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Julie A. Perreault ; Thomas G. Bifano ; B. Martin Levine and Mark N. Horenstein
"Adaptive optic correction using microelectromechanical deformable mirrors", Opt. Eng. 41(3), 561-566 (Mar 01, 2002). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.1447230


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