ULTRAFAST PULSES

Ultrafast laser-induced crystallization of amorphous silicon films

[+] Author Affiliations
Tae Y. Choi

Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, Institute of Energy Technology, CH-8092, Switzerland

David J. Hwang, Costas P. Grigoropoulos

University of California, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Berkeley, California?94720-1740 E-mail: djhmech@newton.berkeley.edu

Opt. Eng. 42(11), 3383-3388 (Nov 01, 2003). doi:10.1117/1.1617312
History: Received Jan. 9, 2003; Revised May 19, 2003; Accepted May 19, 2003; Online October 31, 2003
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Ultrashort pulsed laser irradiation is used to crystallize 100-nm amorphous-silicon (a-Si) films. The crystallization process is observed by time-resolved pump-and-probe reflection imaging in the range of 0.2 ps to 100 ns. The in-situ images, in conjunction with postprocessed scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) mapping of the crystallized structure, provide evidence for nonthermal ultra-fast phase transition and subsequent surface-initiated crystallization. © 2003 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

© 2003 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Tae Y. Choi ; David J. Hwang and Costas P. Grigoropoulos
"Ultrafast laser-induced crystallization of amorphous silicon films", Opt. Eng. 42(11), 3383-3388 (Nov 01, 2003). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.1617312


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