Laser-Based Measurements

Determination of view vectors from image warping mapping functions

[+] Author Affiliations
David S. Nobes

Cranfield University, School of Engineering, Optical Sensors Group, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL, United Kingdom

Bernhard Wieneke

LaVision GmbH, Anna-Vandenhoek-Ring 19, D-37081 Go¨ttingen, Germany

Ralph P. Tatam

Cranfield University, School of Engineering, Optical Sensors Group, Cranfield, Bedfordshire, MK43 0AL, United Kingdom E-mail: r.p.tatam@cranfield.ac.uk

Opt. Eng. 43(2), 407-414 (Feb 01, 2004). doi:10.1117/1.1636765
History: Received Oct. 18, 2002; Revised Mar. 27, 2003; Revised Jul. 25, 2003; Accepted Aug. 7, 2003; Online March 03, 2004
Text Size: A A A

The measurands of several reported laser-based measurement techniques are sensitive to both the propagation direction of the laser and the viewing direction from the region of interest to the detector. For such imaging techniques, the view vector must be determined uniquely for each pixel in the detector array. The bulk view vector is often physically measured and a simple model used to determine the view vector for each pixel. This, however, has limitations where access is limited, the distances involved are small, or the optical system employed introduces errors. We describe a procedure to determine the unique view vector from a planar region to the detector (CCD camera) for each element in a 2-D array based on a reference target aligned with the planar region of interest. Determination of the view vector is based on the spatial distribution of the mapping function used to dewarp the view. No physical measurement of the view vector is required. Good agreement is achieved when the procedure is compared to a simple pin-hole camera model of the view using a computed test target. © 2004 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

© 2004 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

David S. Nobes ; Bernhard Wieneke and Ralph P. Tatam
"Determination of view vectors from image warping mapping functions", Opt. Eng. 43(2), 407-414 (Feb 01, 2004). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.1636765


Tables

Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

Advertisement


 

  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.