Holography

Direct fringe writing architecture for photorefractive polymer-based holographic displays: analysis and implementation

[+] Author Affiliations
Sundeep Jolly

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Media Lab, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Rm. E15-443d, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139

Daniel E. Smalley

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Media Lab, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Rm. E15-443d, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139

James Barabas

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Media Lab, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Rm. E15-443d, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139

V. Michael Bove, Jr.

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Media Lab, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Rm. E15-443d, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139

Opt. Eng. 52(5), 055801 (May 07, 2013). doi:10.1117/1.OE.52.5.055801
History: Received March 21, 2013; Revised April 9, 2013; Accepted April 12, 2013
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Abstract.  An optical architecture for updatable photorefractive polymer-based holographic displays via the direct fringe writing of computer-generated holograms is presented. In contrast to interference-based stereogram techniques for hologram exposure in photorefractive polymer (PRP) materials, the direct fringe writing architecture simplifies system design, reduces system footprint and cost, and offers greater affordances over the types of holographic images that can be recorded. This paper reviews motivations and goals for employing a direct fringe writing architecture for photorefractive holographic imagers, describes our implementation of direct fringe transfer, presents a phase-space analysis of the coherent imaging of fringe patterns from spatial light modulator to PRP, and presents resulting experimental holographic images on the PRP resulting from direct fringe transfer.

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© 2013 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Sundeep Jolly ; Daniel E. Smalley ; James Barabas and V. Michael Bove, Jr.
"Direct fringe writing architecture for photorefractive polymer-based holographic displays: analysis and implementation", Opt. Eng. 52(5), 055801 (May 07, 2013). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.OE.52.5.055801


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