Imaging Components, Systems, and Processing

Flatfield correction errors due to spectral mismatching

[+] Author Affiliations
Nathan Hagen

University of Arizona, College of Optical Sciences, 1630 East University, Boulevard, Tucson, Arizona 85721, United States

Opt. Eng. 53(12), 123107 (Dec 09, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.OE.53.12.123107
History: Received October 6, 2014; Accepted November 4, 2014
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Abstract.  Flat field calibration of broadband imaging systems is widely used, and it has been said that users should try to make the spectrum of the flatfield calibration light source as close as possible to that of the measurement object. However, a quantitative analysis of the error induced by a mismatch of calibration and object spectra has been lacking. In order to develop this quantitative analysis, we provide a theoretical radiometric model for flatfield calibration and show how this spectral mismatching error arises. Simulations covering a variety of measurement scenarios indicate that spectral mismatching can create quantitative errors of up to a factor of 5 in situations that are regularly encountered by researchers performing quantitative work.

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© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Nathan Hagen
"Flatfield correction errors due to spectral mismatching", Opt. Eng. 53(12), 123107 (Dec 09, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.OE.53.12.123107


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