Optical Design and Engineering

Incoupling and outcoupling of light from a luminescent rod using a compound parabolic concentrator

[+] Author Affiliations
Stijn Roelandt, Hugo Thienpont

Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Faculty of Engineering Sciences, Brussels Photonics Team, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels, Belgium

Youri Meuret

KU Leuven, ESAT—Light & Lighting Laboratory, Gebroeders De Smetstraat 1, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium

Dick K. G. de Boer, Dominique Bruls

Philips, Philips Research, High Tech Campus 4, 5656 AA Eindhoven, Netherlands

Patrick Van De Voorde

Philips, Philips Lighting, Steenweg op Gierle 417, B-2300 Turnhout, Belgium

Opt. Eng. 54(5), 055101 (May 12, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.OE.54.5.055101
History: Received January 7, 2015; Accepted April 21, 2015
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Abstract.  Secondary optics that allow for the integration of a light-emitting diode (LED)-based luminescent light source into various étendue-limited applications—such as projection systems—are investigated. Using both simulations and experiments, we have shown that the optical efficacy of the luminescent light source can be increased using a collimator. A thorough analysis of the influence of the collimator’s refractive index on the optical outcoupling and luminance is investigated and it is shown that it is most optimal to use a refractive index of 1.5. The optimal shape of the collimator is equal to that of a compound parabolic concentrator. Experimental results show that by using a collimator, we can improve the amount of outcoupled light with a factor of 1.8 up to 2.1 depending on the used optical configuration of the LED-based luminescent light source.

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© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Stijn Roelandt ; Youri Meuret ; Dick K. G. de Boer ; Dominique Bruls ; Patrick Van De Voorde, et al.
"Incoupling and outcoupling of light from a luminescent rod using a compound parabolic concentrator", Opt. Eng. 54(5), 055101 (May 12, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.OE.54.5.055101


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