Materials, Photonic Devices, and Sensors

Inverse analysis of near-infrared transmission spectra for triarylamine dye

[+] Author Affiliations
Daniel C. Aiken, Scott A. Ramsey, Troy B. Mayo, Joseph Edward Peak

U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Signature Technology Office, 4555 Overlook Avenue, Southwest Washington, DC 20375, United States

Samuel G. Lambrakos

U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Center for Computational Materials, Materials Science and Technology Division, 4555 Overlook Avenue, Southwest Washington, DC 20375, United States

Opt. Eng. 54(11), 117101 (Nov 02, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.OE.54.11.117101
History: Received July 7, 2015; Accepted September 18, 2015
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Abstract.  Inverse analysis of transmission spectra for triarylamine dye in acetone is presented. This analysis employed a parametric model of transmission through a sample of finite thickness, where the permittivity function was represented parametrically by a linear combination of Lorentzian functions. The results of this analysis provided estimates of the permittivity function for triarylamine dye, which can be adopted as input data to other types of models, such as those for prediction of transmission and reflectivity spectra for composites containing mixtures of dyes and other materials. In addition, this analysis demonstrated that the absorption coefficients for a dye, which were obtained by inverse analysis of transmission spectra for that dye in solution, can be validated as reasonable estimates of the absorption coefficients for that dye in fabric.

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© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Daniel C. Aiken ; Scott A. Ramsey ; Troy B. Mayo ; Samuel G. Lambrakos and Joseph Edward Peak
"Inverse analysis of near-infrared transmission spectra for triarylamine dye", Opt. Eng. 54(11), 117101 (Nov 02, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.OE.54.11.117101


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