Imaging Components, Systems, and Processing

Spectrum slicer for snapshot spectral imaging

[+] Author Affiliations
Miu Tamamitsu, Keiichi Nakagawa

University of Tokyo, Department of Chemistry, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan

Yutaro Kitagawa, Kentaro Motohara

University of Tokyo, Institute of Astronomy, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015, Japan

Ryoichi Horisaki

Osaka University, Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, 1-5 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan

Yu Oishi

RIKEN Nishina Center, Advanced Meson Laboratory, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan

Shin-ya Morita

RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan

Tokyo Denki University, Faculty of Engineering, 5 Senju-asahi-cho, Adachi-ku, Tokyo 120-8551, Japan

Yutaka Yamagata

RIKEN Center for Advanced Photonics, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198, Japan

Keisuke Goda

University of Tokyo, Department of Chemistry, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan

University of California, Department of Electrical Engineering, Electrical Engineering IV Building, 420 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, California 90095-1594, United States

Opt. Eng. 54(12), 123115 (Dec 29, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.OE.54.12.123115
History: Received June 9, 2015; Accepted November 24, 2015
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Abstract.  We propose and demonstrate an optical component that overcomes critical limitations in our previously demonstrated high-speed multispectral videography—a method in which an array of periscopes placed in a prism-based spectral shaper is used to achieve snapshot multispectral imaging with the frame rate only limited by that of an image-recording sensor. The demonstrated optical component consists of a slicing mirror incorporated into a 4f-relaying lens system that we refer to as a spectrum slicer (SS). With its simple design, we can easily increase the number of spectral channels without adding fabrication complexity while preserving the capability of high-speed multispectral videography. We present a theoretical framework for the SS and its experimental utility to spectral imaging by showing real-time monitoring of a dynamic colorful event through five different visible windows.

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© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Miu Tamamitsu ; Yutaro Kitagawa ; Keiichi Nakagawa ; Ryoichi Horisaki ; Yu Oishi, et al.
"Spectrum slicer for snapshot spectral imaging", Opt. Eng. 54(12), 123115 (Dec 29, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.OE.54.12.123115


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