Special Section on Digital Photoelasticity: Advancements and Applications

Photoelastic materials and methods for tissue biomechanics applications

[+] Author Affiliations
Rachel A. Tomlinson

The University of Sheffield, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD, United Kingdom

Zeike A. Taylor

The University of Sheffield, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD, United Kingdom

The University of Sheffield, CISTIB Centre for Computational Imaging and Simulation Technologies in Biomedicine, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD, United Kingdom

The University of Sheffield, INSIGNEO Institute for in silico Medicine, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD, United Kingdom

Opt. Eng. 54(8), 081208 (May 13, 2015). doi:10.1117/1.OE.54.8.081208
History: Received February 3, 2015; Accepted April 15, 2015
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Abstract.  Digital photoelasticity offers enormous potential for the validation of computational models of biomedical soft tissue applications. The challenges of creating suitable birefringent surrogate materials are outlined. The recent progress made in the development of photoelastic materials and full-field, quantitative methods for biomechanics applications is illustrated with two complementary case studies: needle insertion and shaken baby syndrome. Initial experiments are described and the future exciting possibilities of using digital photoelasticity are discussed.

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© 2015 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Rachel A. Tomlinson and Zeike A. Taylor
"Photoelastic materials and methods for tissue biomechanics applications", Opt. Eng. 54(8), 081208 (May 13, 2015). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.OE.54.8.081208


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